Nucleonica Physical Constants updated to 2018 CODATA recommended values

August 13th, 2019
by Joseph Magill

The values of the physical constants used in Nucleonica are recommended by CODATA and are the latest available. Termed the “2018 CODATA recommended values” they are recognized worldwide for use in science and technology. The values became available on 20 May 2019 and replaced the 2014 CODATA set. They are based on all data available until 31 December 2018.NewPCs-2019Of particular important to the Nucleonica applications, IUPAC is recommending a new definition of the mole based on a specified number of elementary entities:
The mole, symbol mol, is the SI unit of amount of substance. One mole contains exactly 6.022 140 76 × 1023 elementary entities. This number is the fixed numerical value of the Avogadro constant, NA, when expressed in mol−1, and is called the Avogadro number.
More information
2019 redefinition of the SI base units
A new definition for the mole based on the Avogadro constant
A NEW DEFINITION OF THE MOLE HAS ARRIVED (IUPAC)

Posted in Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart, Nucleonica | Comments

Metastable states in the Karslruhe Nuclide Chart

July 24th, 2019
by Joseph Magill

Qu. (from M. R. KTE Karlsruhe, Germany):
Dear Nucleonica Team,
I have always wondered what the criteria are to show the metastable state of a nuclide on the chart. The first guess would be the half life of the state. But I found for example the nuclide Rn-214 which shows a metastable state of only 0,69 ns. Is there an arbitrary threshold just below that number where you show the state on the chart if it is above? If the threshold depends on the half life, is there a scientific reason for that threshold? Are all states shown that are above that threshold?
Rn214Ans. (Nucleonica Team)
Metastable states, which do not undergo alpha or beta decays or spontaneous fission, i.e. decay only by isomeric transition are shown (usually) only if their half-life is larger than 1 s (to save space).

Rn 214 excited states Rn 214m and Rn 214n have been observed, both with alpha decay to Po 210. Although their half-lives are less than 1s they are shown in KNC. In this way the users of KNC can know that the alpha emission is not from the ground state of Rn 214 and can have higher energy than the Q-value of ground state to ground state decay.
In some particular cases when the metastable state has an important role in a decay chain or in nuclear physics theory, it is presented even it decays only with isomeric transition and has a half-life shorter than 1s.
There is an interesting article on wikipedia.

Posted in FAQs, Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart | Comments

How can I find the spontaneous fission yields used in the Decay Engine++?

July 18th, 2019
by Joseph Magill

This question is only relevant if at least the parent nuclide or one of its daughter nuclides decays by spontaneous fission.
In the results data grid (in the Decay Engine tab) the decay modes of the nuclides are shown with the corresponding branching ratios. For spontaneous fission only the total branching ratio for all fission products is given.

In the Decay Tree tab in turn each produced nuclide is shown in the decay tree with the half-life, the number of atoms, the number of disintegrations and the branching ratio from the parent nuclide to the considered nuclide. If the nuclide is a fission product this branching ratio is calculated as the branching ratio of the SF decay mode from the parent nuclide times the independent fission yield of the fission product.

In the databases JEFF and ENDF databases used inside Nucleonica the spontaneous fission yields are reported for three nuclides Cm-242, Cm-244 and Cf-252. Many other nuclides however decay by SF in which case the yields of Cm-244 are used.

For example, consider the decay Cm-248 and the fission daughter nuclide Mo-104. In the Decay Tree tab, this nuclide can be highlighted. The decay tree can be collapsed to show only the branches leading to the nuclide of interest Mo-104 as shown below.
Cm248 Decay TreeFig.1: The collapsed decay tree computed by the Decay Engine++ showing the decay branches leading to the highlighted nuclide of interest Mo-104.

In the above figure, the first occurrence of Mo-104 is as a fission product of Pu-244. The SF branching ratio of Pu-244 can be found in the results grid as 0.00125 whereas the BR of Mo-104 is given in the above figure as 6.95e-5. It follows that the independent fission yield of Mo-144 (from parent Cm-244 since no date for Pu-244 is available) will be:
Yind(Mo-104) = BR(Mo-104) / BRsf(Pu-244) = 6.95e-5 / 0.00125 = 5.56%
This is exactly the Ind. Yield given in the Fission Yields app for the parent Cm-244.

The second occurrence of Mo-104 in figure 1 is as a fission product of Cm248. From the results grid BRsf(Cm-248) = 0.0839. Again
Yind(Mo-104) = BR(Mo-104) / BRsf(Cm-248) = 4.67e-3 / 0.0839 = 5.57%
This independent fission yield can be found in the Fission Yields app from the Cm-244 parent nuclide (because neither Pu-244 nor Cm-248 are in the database), using the JEFF-3.1 library and the spontaneous fission type for the given nuclide.

In the tree structure in fig. 1, further occurrences of Mo-104 as a daughter of fission products are shown.

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Nuclide ID in ZZAAA (or ZAID) format possible?

June 26th, 2019
by Joseph Magill

Qu. (from F. B. KIT-INE Karlsruhe, Germany):
Dear Nucleonica Team,
To import .csv files to Nuclide Mixtures ++ we have to give the Nuclide ID as e.g.
PU241, Pu-241 or Pu 241. However many programs use the ZZAAA notation (or ZAID notation): 94241. Hence it would be great to have the ZZAAA notation as .csv input accepted too. It this possible?

Further info: The MCNP6 suggestion for representing metastable isotopes seems to be a good idea: adjust the AAA value using the following convention:
AAA’=(AAA+300)+(m × 100), where m is the metastable level and m=1, 2, 3, or 4.
For naturally occurring elements, AAA=000 is suggested, for example 008000 represents the element oxygen.

Ans. (Nucleonica Team)
We now have the ZAID format working in the nuclide mixtures..

For example, you can upload a file with the data…
Nuclide, Activity(Bq)
95241, 1e6

This will then be interpreted as Am-241.
Further format options are shown in the figure below. The notation 92238 represents U-238.
Mixtures-formatsMore info…
ZAID format
Allowed file formats

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Application loading and running times

June 12th, 2019
by Joseph Magill

Working with Nucleonica the user may notice differences in the loading times not only between different applications but also for the same application loaded at different times. Analogously the execution time of a given application and for the same calculation may vary over time.

In particular, after a maintenance or new deployment operation on the server the different memory caches are empty and the first call to an application may take significantly longer than a second or further calls to that application issued from the same or another user. The same is true for calculations involving intensive database operations such as gamma spectrum modelling or calculation of a large decay trees with lots of fission products.

Clearly different applications use more or less data generally retrieved from the underlying databases. The CPU time needed to prepare the data depends on the activity level on the server but can generally be neglected except when extensive calculations are involved. The transmission time over the net is proportional to the data amount to be transmitted and depends on many factors like the location of the client, the quality of the connection or the time of day. The time needed to load the data from the database in turn depends on whether the data are read from the disk or retrieved from the memory cache which is much faster than a disk operation.

Posted in FAQs, Nucleonica | Comments

Uploading Nuclides with Metastable States in Nucleonica

June 5th, 2019
by Joseph Magill

Qu. (from M. R. KTE-Karlsruhe, Germany):
Dear Nucleonica Team,
We are expanding the usage of the decay engine in Nucleonica into more and more groups to make time corrections to nuclide mixtures. While doing so we encountered a difficulty that you might be able to help us with:
When uploading a mixture with many different nuclides, we sometimes get the data from our database „KADABRA“. For mostly historical reasons in this database the nuclides are written in a slightly different way than is common in Nucleonica. So we are having problems with the writing of the metastable nuclides such as „Am-242m“ or „Nb-93m“ which are written in big letters „AM-242M“ and „NB-93M“. When we upload these nuclides, the „M“ for the metastable state is ignored and the nuclides would be read as „Am-242“ and „Nb-93“. We just thought it might be possible on your side to accept also big letters for the metastable states in the code or throw an error message when that happens. This way it would be easier to identify the mistake, because otherwise we don’t see it and continue working with wrong mixtures.
Do you think it is possible to accept the big letters for metastable states in the code?

Ans. (Nucleonica Team)
This problem has now been resolved. The nuclide mixtures app now accepts capital letters.

The image below shows the Nuclide Mixtures upload tab with the nuclide names in capital letters.
TestM

More info…
Nuclide Mixtures wiki page

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New publication on the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart

May 27th, 2019
by Joseph Magill

Obtaining nuclear data is an international activity with new and updated data constantly being determined by thousands of scientists at major research centres worldwide. Because of the large amounts of data generated and the formats used to store these data, the field of nuclear data is highly specialised. To make the most important key data more accessible to a wider audience, nuclide charts have been developed. In this publication, we present the scientific highlights of the new 10th Edition of the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart.
Fig1epjn The main focus of this Chart is to provide structured, accurate information on the half-lives and decay modes, as well as energies of the emitted radiation for over 4000 experimentally observed ground states and isomer nuclides to an interdisciplinary audience.

More information…
Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart – New 10th edition 2018, EPJ Nuclear Sci. Technol.
Volume 5, 2019
(pdf)
New 10th Edition (2018) of the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart
Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart Online Shop

Posted in Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart, Nucleonica | Comments

New Short Names for Nucleonica Apps

April 30th, 2019
by Joseph Magill

Nucleonica applications are represented as “tiles” in the App Portal. For every application there is a tile consisting of a header “Short Name” and a body “Full Name”. As an example, in the image below, the short name GSG refers to the application Gamma Spectrum Generator++.
To make the tile names more intuitive, new “Short Names” have been introduced for many Apps. These are shown in the image below for the filter category “last used”.
NewShortNames2As can be seen the new short names are more intuitive than the older names e.g. Datasheet (old name NuDat++), Explorer (Expl++), decay (DE++), Search (NuS/RaS). It should be noted that the Radiological Converter and Mass Activity Converter new short names are Conv. Pro and Conv. respectively. The gamma library apps have also been renamed to gLib Pro and gLib. The gamma dosimetry and shielding apps have the new short names gH*(10) and gD&S.

More info…
App Portal wiki page

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Nuclear Security Exercises now available to all Nucleonica users

March 28th, 2019
by Joseph Magill

In Nucleonica’s e-Learning center (e-Learn app), a series of nuclear security exercises has been released for all Nucleonica users.
eL-NSENucleonica’s e-Learning Centre showing the nuclear security exercises.

These exercises have been developed jointly with Dr. Emily Alice Kröger from the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt für Strahlenschutz) and the Nucleonica Team. The exercises were developed for use in BfS training courses on Nucleonica held on a regular basis. Because of the general interest in these presentations, we have released them for general use by Nucleonica users.

More info…
Nucleonica’s e-Learing Centre

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webKORIGEN and DELNuS updates

March 26th, 2019
by Joseph Magill

WebKORIGEN is a Nucleonica application for the simulation of the time evolution of a nuclide inventory in power reactors. A related application, DELNuS (Decay Engine for Large Nuclide Sets), allows the user to make decay calculations for a large number of nuclides (typically present in a reactor).
Following a new compilation (2019), a number of updates and improvements in the webKORIGEN and DELNuS applications have been made:
webKORIGEN:
– it is now possible to make Ra226 irradations in the flux mode.
– new tabs show the cross section data (also burnup dependent ) and decay data used in the calculations for the various reactor types.
– in the results grid, nuclide half-lives have been added
wKOwebKORIGEN user interface

DELNuS
– a problem with using mixtures in DELNuS has been resolved.
– in the results grid, the nuclide half-lives have been added
– decay data used in the calculations are displayed
DELNuSDELNuS user interface

More info…
webKORIGEN
Neutron irradiation with webKORIGEN
DELNuS

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